https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/issue/feed Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research 2024-06-19T04:49:37+00:00 Prof. Mahmoud Rushdi editor@advetresearch.com Open Journal Systems <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><strong><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Focus and Scope</span></strong></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;"><strong>Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research</strong> is an international journal that publishes research in all matters relevant to the veterinary profession. The mission of the Journal is to provide students, veterinarians and researchers with the current advanced research in different veterinary disciplines. The key objective of the Journal is to promote the art and science of veterinary medicine and the betterment of animal health and production.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Articles will be peer-reviewed, published online as a full text, and under the Open Access publishing model.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research publishes articles (Original research, Short communications, Review article and Case report) four times yearly (quarterly), and has four issues (January, April, July and October) in its yearly volume. Special issues may be published in between the regular issues.</p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Print): 2090-6269</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Online): 2090-6277</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Publication Charge: Articles are published free of charge.</p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Donation: Click the link to send donation to advetres@instapay<br /><a href="https://ipn.eg/S/advetres/instapay/2ENvrg">https://ipn.eg/S/advetres/instapay/2ENvrg</a><br />Powered by InstaPay</p> https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1963 Cow's milk screening for veterinary drug and pollutant residues in Ukraine for the period from 2020 to 2023 2024-06-19T04:49:37+00:00 Svitlana Shulyak dia_sveta_@ukr.net Oleksandr Orobchenko toxy-lab@ukr.net Natalia Liniichuk galkanat@ukr.net Marina Romanko marina_biochem@ukr.net Yulia Dobrozhan alamerster@gmail.com Zoya Malimon z_malimon@ukr.net <p>Dairy industry is leading in the structure of the food industry of Ukraine at the current stage. It consists of the butter production, cheese production, and milk-canning sub-sectors, as well as manufacturing of whole milk products, since the products of this industry occupy an important place in the consumption of the population. Therefore, research on regulation, toxicological and hygienic assessment of toxic contaminants of various origins must be conducted. The purpose of this study was to assess the cow's milk from Ukrainian farms for presence of key safety indicators over the past 4 years, namely: residues of antibiotics, nitrofurans, coccidiostats, insecticides, fungicides, anthelmintics, corticosteroids, glucocorticosteroids, organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides, mycotoxins, toxic elements, radionuclides. In the period of 2020-2023 7138 samples of cow’s milk from native dairy enterprises from 25 regions of Ukraine were screened for the content of various dangerous substances and compounds from groups A and B which are declared in Directive 96/23/EC. It was established that the milk of cows from Ukraine meets current national standards and is not inferior in terms of quality and safety to EU indicators. Among the inconsistent results, it is worth highlighting the presence of Chloramphenicol in 0.85% of milk samples out of 234 tested for its content, which was 0.03% of the total number of samples, while the content of other investigated drugs and substances was below of the methods detection limit.</p> Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1962 Prevalence and determinants of E. coli O157:H7 and multi-drug resistant strains in wash water, processed and heat-and-serve chicken, and handlers in Plateau State, Nigeria 2024-06-16T21:35:37+00:00 Innocent innocent.nwankwo@unn.edu.ng Samuel Atanu sammujunior@yahoo.com Ekene Ezenduka ekene.ezenduka@unn.edu.ng Ojonugwa Agada kinginnoma@yahoo.com <p><em>E. coli </em>O157:H7 is zoonotic and constitutes public health risk to handlers and consumers of contaminated chicken. Limited data exit on the prevalence of <em>E. coli</em>O157: H7 and multi-drug resistant strains in chicken and in–contact humans in Plateau State, Nigeria. This study determined the prevalence and risk factors of <em>E. coli </em>O157:H7 and multi-drug resistant strains in wash water, raw and heat-and-serve chicken, and handlers in Plateau State, Nigeria. A total of 224 swabs of the sample sources were analyzed for <em>E. coli </em>and antimicrobial resistance of the isolates assessed using standard microbiological methods. Questionnaire on the risk practices were given to the meat handlers. A total of 47 (21%) <em>E. coli</em> spp. was positive, of which 8 (17%) were <em>E. coli</em> O157:H7 using PCR technique. <em>E. coli</em> O157:H7 and other strains were resistant to ampicillin (63% and 83%), ciprofloxacin (13% and 28%), tetracycline (13% and 47%), sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprin (0% and 38%), azithromycin (0% and 13%), and cefotaxime (0% and 17%) respectively. Sensitive to azithromycin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprin were 100% for <em>E. coli</em> O157:H7 as other strains to amikacin. Multi drug resistance and MARI were at 43% and 0.6 respectively with 9 resistant patterns. Educational attainment was significantly associated (p&lt;0.05) with meat safety awareness unlike age, sex and working experience among meat handlers in Plateau State. <em>E. coli</em>&nbsp;O157:H7 and multidrug-resistant strains were prevalent in water, processed and heat-and-serve chicken, and handlers in Plateau State, Nigeria and calls for improved meat safety awareness and antimicrobial resistance menace in the state.</p> Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1961 Prevalence, Genetic Characteristics and Economic Losses of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMD) in Global and Bangladesh Context: A Review 2024-06-15T14:58:26+00:00 Md Zulfekar Ali zulfekar@blri.gov.bd Dolly Dewan dewandolly3@gmail.com Mirza Mienur Meher mienur@bsmrau.edu.bd <p>Foot and Mouth disease virus (FMD) is a transboundary animal disease (TAD) affecting global cloven-hooved wild and domesticated animals. It is recognized as a significant economic infectious disease in the livestock business. Domesticated animals such as goats, sheep, cattle, pigs, and buffalo are vulnerable hosts for FMD. This RNA virus is classified as a member of the Aphthovirus genus in the Picornaviridae family. It encompasses around 60 subtypes and is further divided into 7 serotypes: C, O, A, SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, and Asia1. There is no cross-protection across different serotypes, and occasionally, the effectiveness of vaccination may be restricted, even when targeting the same serotype. Therefore, it is crucial to identify and classify the viruses currently in circulation, especially when vaccination is employed for disease management. Hence, it is necessary to administer multivalent vaccines with genetically matching vaccines in circulation to ensure adequate protection through immunization. Bangladesh has a high cattle population, and FMD&nbsp;leads to significant economic losses for farmers. Serotypes A, O, and Asia 1 are circulating in Bangladesh. The most common serotype is O, although Bangladesh has reported multiple serotype&nbsp;infections. Strategic vaccination, immunity screening, and outbreak surveillance are being examined for FMD management in Bangladesh. This review&nbsp;analyses FMD epidemiology, genetics, diagnostics, economic impacts, and prevention-control efforts worldwide, emphasizing Bangladesh. Finally, the study recommends FMD management advice for endemic settings.&nbsp;</p> Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1960 Digital Transformation of Livestock Farming for Sustainable Development 2024-06-14T23:23:54+00:00 Asif Raihan asifraihan666@gmail.com Homaira Afroz Himu afrozhomaira661@gmail.com <p>With the increasing global population, livestock farming must adapt to respond to the growing demands for food while increasing productivity more efficiently. At the same time, worries about animal welfare, environmental sustainability, and public health must be addressed. The objective of this article is to present an overview of recent developments in using biometric devices, big data, and blockchain technology to digitize&nbsp;animal husbandry in Precision Livestock Farming (PLF). Biometric sensors are devices&nbsp;that monitor the health and behavior of an individual animal. Farmers may use this information for doing population-level analysis. Big data analytics systems use statistical algorithms to analyze large and complex data sets, identifying relevant trending patterns and providing guidance on decisions for farmers. These systems analyze and combine data from biometric sensors. Blockchain technology with sensors makes it safe and easy to track animal products from the farm to the table. This is an effective way to monitor&nbsp;disease outbreaks, prevent&nbsp;economic losses, and mitigate&nbsp;food-related health pandemics. The adoption of PLF technologies throughout the livestock sector can help to achieve sustainable development.</p> Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1959 Role of some natural oils on competing multidrug resistant Bacillus cereus in meat products 2024-06-14T20:16:30+00:00 Wageh Darwish wagehdarwish@gmail.com Abdelazim Elsayed Elhelaly drelhelaly@gmail.com Wafaa M. Gad wafaagad2020@gmail.com Nashwa M. Zaki alnouracademy@yahoo.com Lamiaa M. Reda lamiaareda@gmail.com Amany M. Shosha amaanyshosha@gmail.com <p>Meat products such as beef mince, luncheon, sausage, and pasterma are essential sources of essential amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. However, such products might act as potential sources to foodborne pathogens such as <em>Bacillus cereus (B. cereus)</em>. The current study aims firstly to investigate the prevalence of <em>B. cereus</em> in the retailed meat products in Egypt's local markets. Second, PCR was used to test for <em>B. cereus</em> enterotoxin-coding genes, such as non-haemotylic enterotoxin (<em>nhe</em>), haemolysin B (<em>hbl</em>), and cereulide (<em>ces</em>), which are the causes of diarrheal illness. In addition, antimicrobial resistance of the recovered <em>B. cereus</em> isolates was screened. Besides, the antimicrobial activities of olive and ginger oils against <em>B. cereus</em> were screened. The data collected revealed isolation of <em>B. cereus</em> from the examined samples at 4%, 6%, 10%, and 16% from the examined luncheon, sausage, pasterma, and minced meat, respectively. The enterotoxin-coding genes (<em>nhe, hbl, and ces</em>) were detected in the recovered <em>B. cereus</em> isolates. It's likely that multidrug resistance profiling was present in the retrieved isolates. It's interesting to note that ginger and olive oils had clear anti-<em>B. cereus</em> activity, especially at 2% concentration. Therefore, when producing such meat products, adequate hygiene procedures should be adopted. In the food industry, it is strongly encouraged to utilize 2% ginger and olive oils.</p> Copyright (c)