Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><strong><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Focus and Scope</span></strong></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;"><strong>Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research</strong> is an international journal that publishes research in all matters relevant to the veterinary profession. The mission of the Journal is to provide students, veterinarians and researchers with the current advanced research in different veterinary disciplines. The key objective of the Journal is to promote the art and science of veterinary medicine and the betterment of animal health and production.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Articles will be peer-reviewed, published online as a full text, and under the Open Access publishing model.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research publishes articles (Original research, Short communications, Review article and Case report) four times yearly (quarterly), and has four issues (January, April, July and October) in its yearly volume. Special issues may be published in between the regular issues.</p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Print): 2090-6269</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Online): 2090-6277</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Publication Charge: Articles are published free of charge.</p> Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research en-US Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research 2090-6269 <p>Users have the right to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles under the following conditions: Creative Commons&nbsp;Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).</p> <p dir="LTR">For more information:&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank"><img src="https://licensebuttons.net/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" alt="" width="88" height="31"></a></p> <div class="six columns omega"> <p><strong>Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs&nbsp;<br>CC BY-NC-ND</strong></p> <p><strong>This work is licensed under a&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank">Creative Commons&nbsp;Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives&nbsp;4.0 International&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND&nbsp;4.0) license</a></strong></p> </div> Dose dependent effect of phytase supplementation on hematological parameters, serum biochemical analysis, carcass characteristics, and chemical meat analysis of Hubbard broiler chickens. https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1922 <p>Since the start of the current century, the incorporation of enzymes that degrade phytate in chicken diets has greatly enhanced the sustainability of chicken meat production. The current study aims to ascertain the optimal effects of phytase supplementation on complete blood count (CBC), liver function tests, Ca, and P, carcass characteristics, and chemical meat analysis of Hubbard broiler chickens. A total of 270 one-day-old Hubbard broilers were distributed randomly among six groups. The experimental groups were Group 1 (G1) served as the control and was provided with standard basal diets. G2, G3, G4, G5, and G6 were supplemented with standard basal diets containing 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200g/ton of phytase, respectively. On the 35th day, five birds from every group were selected and slaughtered to conduct CBC, liver function tests, Ca and P analysis, evaluation of carcass traits, and chemical analysis of breast muscles. The results revealed that elevating inclusion of phytase up to 150 and 200g/ton significantly increased carcass yield and decreased abdominal fat compared to the 50, 75,100g/ton. Protein% of breast meat showed a marked increase in G5 and G6. CBC and serum biochemical parameters were not affected by phytase supplementation. In conclusion, incorporating phytase at higher doses in broiler diets can improve carcass yield, maintain normal meat quality, and have no adverse effect on CBC or liver function tests.</p> Aya Mahmoud Nasser Khedr Ahmed Medhat Hegazy Copyright (c) 14 4 The role of nuclear factor kappa beta signaling in the therapeutic effect of tadalafil against dexamethasone-induced gastric ulcer in rats https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1921 <p>Gastric ulceration is a common gastrointestinal ailment with serious consequences that can lead to serious illness or even death. This study aims to examine the efficacy of tadalafil (TAD) and dexlansoprazole (DLP) in treating stomach ulcers caused by dexamethasone (DEX) in male albino Wister rats. Thirty male albino Wister rats were divided into 5 groups (6 rats each): control group received normal saline, positive control and received DEX 5 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal (i.p.) for 7 days, third group received DLP 30 mg/kg/day orally after DEX, fourth group received TAD 5 mg/kg/day orally after DEX, and fifth group received DLP and TAD orally after DEX. Persistence and prevention of ulcers, pepsin activity, mucin content, and histopathological changes were evaluated after each trial. Reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in gastric homogenates. The levels of prostaglandin E<sub>2</sub> (PGE<sub>2</sub>), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in serum were also measured.&nbsp; After treatment with either TAD or DLP alone significantly reduced U.I., pepsin activity, TNF-α, IL-10 and MDA with significant rise in mucin content, PGE<sub>2</sub>, NO, GSH, and improve Histological alteration compared to DEX group. When TAD and DLP were administered together, there was a more notable decrease in U.I., pepsin activity, gastric MDA, TNF-α, and IL-10 with concomitant more significant increase in mucin content, NO content, and PGE<sub>2</sub> production compared to the TAD or DLP groups alone. Compared to each medicine alone, TAD and DLP together have promising therapeutic potential in preventing stomach ulcers caused by DEX.</p> Doaa Hamdy Khaled Hassanein Mohamed Elbadr Mahmoud Sabra Ebtsam Saber Copyright (c) 14 4 Effectiveness of phytase and nonstarch polysaccharides-degrading enzymes on performance, bone mineralization, litter, and gene expression in broiler chickens fed nutritionally reduced diets https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1910 <p>Effects of dietary non-starch polysaccharides-degrading enzymes (NSPase) and phytase complex on performance, carcass, bone minerals, litter, and gene expression (<em>IGF</em>, <em>IL-1β</em>, <em>IL-10</em>, <em>TLR</em>-4, <em>CPT1A)</em> were determined in broilers fed corn-soybean nutrient-reduced diets. Totally, 1200 Ross-308 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned into 4 treatments, with 6 replicates of 50 birds each; (G1) a control nutrient-adequate diet without enzymes supplementation; (G2) received energy-reduced diet (-100 kcal/kg) with NSPase (100 g/ton Econase<sup>®</sup>) + phytase (100 g/ton Quantum Blue<sup>®</sup>; 5,000 FTU/g); (G3) received energy-reduced diet (-80 kcal/kg) with NSPase (250 g/ton Enziver<sup>®</sup>) + phytase (100 g/ton Phytonex<sup>®</sup>; 5,000 FTU/g); (G4) received as G3 diet with a 0.5% decrease in crude protein (CP). For all energy-reduced diets, the nutritional matrix of phytase with reductions of phosphorus (P) (0.15%), and calcium (Ca) (0.165%) was considered. Dietary NSPase and phytase supplementation to a low-energy diet significantly (<em>P&lt;0.05)</em> enhanced body weights, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, and litter quality (lowered nitrogen, phosphorous, and calcium excretion in broiler manure), with constant bone mineralization. No significant effects (<em>P&gt;0.05)</em> on carcass or blood biochemistry. Energy and CP-reduced diet showed better feed intake, immune organ weights, and mineral bioavailability by decreasing Alkaline phosphatase activity. Moreover, upregulated gene expression of <em>IGF</em>-1 in muscles, inflammatory cytokines (<em>IL-1B</em> and <em>IL-10</em>), immune-related genes (<em>TLR</em>-4) in the liver, and (<em>CPT1A</em>) responsible for energy production. Conclusively, dietary NSPase with phytase compensated for up to 0.5% CP, 100 kcal ME/kg, and 0.15% and 0.165% units of Av.P and total Ca, with improving broiler performance and environmental&nbsp;impacts.</p> Basma M. Bawish Elshaimaa Ismael Samar H. Abdelfatah Shaimaa Kamel Khaled Nasr El-din Fahmy Copyright (c) 14 4 Molecular detection of some antibiotic resistance genes of Escherichia coli isolated from bovines subclinical mastitis https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1881 <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: justify; direction: ltr; unicode-bidi: embed;"><span style="mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; color: #252525; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;">Antimicrobial drug resistance is considered an urgent major global public health threat facing humanity. With the rise in the prevalence and severity of both fatal and crippling illnesses, this crisis will have a catastrophic effect on human society. It doesn&rsquo;t only affect public health but also causes serious problems in the dairy industry. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence,antibiotic resistance, and characterization of <em>Escherichia coli</em> that produces extended-spectrum &beta;-lactamase (ESBL) isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis cases.<em> Escherichia coli</em> was detected in 26 out of the 100 subclinical mastitis cases. The antibiotic sensitivity revealed that 10 from 26 isolated <em>&nbsp;Escherichia coli </em>were multidrug resistant. The isolates were most frequently resistant to amoxicillin (AMX) at 53.85 % , ampicillin (AMP) at 46.1% , cefotaxime (CTX) at 42.3% followed by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) at 38.5 %. All 26&nbsp; <em>Escherichia coli </em>isolates were tested for Extended Spectrum b-lactamase by using the disc diffusion method, and the same 10 multidrug- resistant isolates were positive for Extended Spectrum b-Lactamases .All ten multidrug resistance and Extended Spectrum b-Lactamases <em>Escherichia coli </em>isolates were identified genetically by the PhoA gene and were found harboured b-Lactamases antibiotic resistance genes <em>bla</em>TEM 100%, <em>bla</em>CTXM 90%, <em>&nbsp;blaSHV 80 %, and ampC 80 % </em>respectively <em>.</em> The obtained results showed that phenotypic detection of 10 multidrug resistance and Extended Spectrum b-Lactamases isolates were agreed with genotypic molecular detection of b-Lactamases antibiotic resistance genes .</span></p> ayman koriem Copyright (c) 14 4 Evaluation of Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and thiamine pattern for detecting the pork adulteration level in the canned beef in Fayoum Governorate, Egypt https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1915 <p>In Egypt, it is against the law to adulterate meat products, particularly those that are imported and frequently laced with fat or pork. However, it is challenging to identify pork flesh or fat. This study utilized two ways to identify fat and pork meat in canned beef products. The first approach used &nbsp;high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)&nbsp;to estimate the thiamine concentration, and the second applied the Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) to identify the pork DNA in the meat products. From a nearby market in Fayoum Governorate, Egypt, forty arbitrary samples of &nbsp;local or imported canned beef items were gathered. Using RT-PCR and thiamine screening methods, the results demonstrated that 50.0% and 25.0% of the samples that were collected were adulterated with pork flesh, respectively.&nbsp;Also, the research revealed that RT-PCR was more efficient approach for &nbsp;detecting adulteration of canned meat at the level up to &gt; 5.0% ,whereas, the other methods could not detect it at the level more than 10.0%.</p> sahar abdel aleem abdelaziz Samah A. Abd-El Tawab Nabil E. Hafez Nabil E. Hafez Khalil I. Khalil many A. Abd-El Halim Rehab K. Mahmoud Copyright (c) 14 4