Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><strong><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Focus and Scope</span></strong></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;"><strong>Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research</strong> is an international journal that publishes research in all matters relevant to the veterinary profession. The mission of the Journal is to provide students, veterinarians and researchers with the current advanced research in different veterinary disciplines. The key objective of the Journal is to promote the art and science of veterinary medicine and the betterment of animal health and production.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Articles will be peer-reviewed, published online as a full text, and under the Open Access publishing model.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research publishes articles (Original research, Short communications, Review article and Case report) four times yearly (quarterly), and has four issues (January, April, July and October) in its yearly volume. Special issues may be published in between the regular issues.</p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Print): 2090-6269</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Online): 2090-6277</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Publication Charge: Articles are published free of charge.</p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;">Donation: Click the link to send donation to advetres@instapay<br /><a href="https://ipn.eg/S/advetres/instapay/2ENvrg">https://ipn.eg/S/advetres/instapay/2ENvrg</a><br />Powered by InstaPay</p> en-US <p>Users have the right to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles under the following conditions: Creative Commons&nbsp;Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).</p> <p dir="LTR">For more information:&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank"><img src="https://licensebuttons.net/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" alt="" width="88" height="31"></a></p> <div class="six columns omega"> <p><strong>Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs&nbsp;<br>CC BY-NC-ND</strong></p> <p><strong>This work is licensed under a&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank">Creative Commons&nbsp;Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives&nbsp;4.0 International&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND&nbsp;4.0) license</a></strong></p> </div> editor@advetresearch.com (Prof. Mahmoud Rushdi) mrushdi@aun.edu.eg (Mahmoud Rushdi Abd Ellah) Sun, 05 May 2024 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.2.1.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Dose dependent effect of phytase supplementation on hematological parameters, serum biochemical analysis, carcass characteristics, and chemical meat analysis of Hubbard broiler chickens. https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1975 <p>Since the start of the current century, the incorporation of enzymes that degrade phytate in chicken diets has greatly enhanced the sustainability of chicken meat production. The current study aims to ascertain the optimal effects of phytase supplementation on complete blood count (CBC), liver function tests, Ca, and P, carcass characteristics, and chemical meat analysis of Hubbard broiler chickens. A total of 270 one-day-old Hubbard broilers were distributed randomly among six groups. The experimental groups were Group 1 (G1) served as the control and was provided with standard basal diets. G2, G3, G4, G5, and G6 were supplemented with standard basal diets containing 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200g/ton of phytase, respectively. On the 35th day, five birds from every group were selected and slaughtered to conduct CBC, liver function tests, Ca and P analysis, evaluation of carcass traits, and chemical analysis of breast muscles. The results revealed that elevating inclusion of phytase up to 150 and 200g/ton significantly increased carcass yield and decreased abdominal fat compared to the 50, 75,100g/ton. Protein% of breast meat showed a marked increase in G5 and G6. CBC and serum biochemical parameters were not affected by phytase supplementation. In conclusion, incorporating phytase at higher doses in broiler diets can improve carcass yield, maintain normal meat quality, and have no adverse effect on CBC or liver function tests.</p> Aya Mahmoud, Nasser Khedr, Ahmed Medhat Hegazy Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1975 Comprehensive overview of trypanosomiasis: Recent updates https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1974 <p>Trypanosomiasis, also referred to as Surra, is a protozoan illness that affects animals worldwide. Trypanosomes are carried by a vast number of hematophagous flies and are found in the extracellular and internal fluids of certain hosts. Trypanosomiasis has a wide range of hosts, with the primary host species changing depending on the geographical location. Trypanosomosis is mostly characterized by anemia, and the degree of anemia can typically be used as a gauge for the disease's severity. The illness trypanosomiasis compromises the host animal's immune system. Trypanosomiasis diagnosis is dependent on a number of factors, including a thorough clinical examination, suitable sample collection, sample size, suitable diagnostic test performance, and logical interpretation of test results. Trypanosomiasis clinical symptoms can differ greatly in appearance and intensity. The signs of this condition might vary and include neurological issues, skin plaques, and vaginal enlargement. Hematophagous biting flies, including Tabanus, Haematopota, Glossina, Chrysops, Lyperosia, Stomoxys, and Hippobusca flies, contribute to the spread of trypanosomiasis. The economic losses due to trypanosomiasis are quite high, and treatment is cost effective. Four medications are primarily used to treat trypanosomiasis: quinapyramine, karetin, diminazene aceturate (Berenil), and melarsomine (cymelarsan). An efficient vaccination program is an additional technique for managing infectious diseases in addition to treatment. The most important step in stopping the spread of trypanosomiasis is to stop the transmission of flies via physical and chemical methods.</p> Sunaryo Hadi Warsito, Aswin Rafif Khairullah, Mirni Lamid, Mohammad Anam Al-Arif, Herry Agoes Hermadi, Widya Paramita Lokapirnasari, Muhammad Khaliim Jati Kusala, Syahputra Wibowo, Siti Rani Ayuti, Ricadonna Raissa, Ima Fauziah; Ikechukwu Benjamin Moses; Bima Putra Pratama, Sheila Marty Yanestria, Julaeha, Suhita Aryaloka, Kartika Afrida Fauzia Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1974 Impact of Heat Stress on Lactating Egyptian Buffaloes (Bubalis bubalis): Physiological, Hormonal and Oxidative Responses https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1973 <p>Heat stress typically causes substantial financial losses because it lowers animal performance, morbidity, and mortality. It is essential to comprehend the physiological reactions and biochemical alterations through different body homeostasis during various environmental seasons to prevent harmful impacts of heat stress. Objective of this experiment was to evaluate the different seasonal dynamics of the Egyptian buffaloes' oxidative, hormonal, metabolic and physiological responses to the country's summer season climate. Throughout the year, the physiological reactions of twenty lactating water buffaloes were measured. These responses included rectal temperature (RT), respiration rate (RR) and body surface temperature (BST), in addition to serum hormonal, oxidative/antioxidant, and metabolic indices. Significant increases in RR and BST were detected in summer season in relation to winter season when the temperature-humidity index (THI) was higher (&gt;80). The heat stress during the summer season was associated with lower serum antioxidant enzyme levels and higher oxidative stress. Serum cortisol and hepato-renal functional bio-indicators were also significantly elevated in the summer and autumn. In comparison to former seasons, the levels of growth hormone (GH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) were also much reduced in the autumn and summer. THI was found to have a negative relation with physiological and antioxidant indices, but a positive relation with serum cortisol and MDA levels. According to our findings, lactating Egyptian buffaloes have considerable heat stress during the summer season, which necessitates greater managerial measures to prevent animal welfare concerns and economic losses.</p> Mona Hafez, Dr. Kariman A. Esmail, Dr. Hanan A. Edres Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1973 Inhibitory activity of chitosan nanoparticles and Spirulina platensis extract against Candida albicans in thermally treated milk https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1971 <p>Milk is a suitable medium for the growth of many microbes, in particular, fungi and yeasts that change the physical and chemical properties of milk and in the final dairy products. In the current study, the target was to apply natural components to control growth of <em>Candida albicans</em> in pasteurized milk. Chitosan (CS), chitosan nanoparticles (CSN), and <em>spirulina plantasis</em> (SP) and its extract (SPE) were used. The MIC (12.5 to 100 mg/ml) of the natural components against <em>Candida albicans</em> as a model for fungi family was determined their effect in broth and in pasteurized milk. CS and CSN were the most effective natural component inhibit the growth of C.<em> albicans </em>strain with concentration 25 mg/ml followed by SPE with inhibitory activity against <em>C.albicans</em> at concentration 100 mg/ml while, <em>Spirulina platensis</em> (SP) showed the least inhibitory activity with the same concentration. By application in pasteurized milk CSN showed the best candidacidal effect with inhibitory 1.2 log<sub>10</sub>cfu/ml after 15day at refrigerated storage as adding CSN extended shelf life of pasteurized milk. On conclusion, we recommend adding chitosan nanoparticles in milk at conc 25mg/ml to limit the fungal growth</p> Dina Awad, Dina A. B. Awad, Hamdi Abdelsamei Mohamed, hend Elbarbery, Sara Nazmy Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1971 A systematic review and meta-analysis of abortion diseases in camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Algeria https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1969 <p>Abortions are one of the most important reproductive disorders that can lead to huge economic losses in camel farming. This study aims to review the various abortive diseases in camels (<em>Camelus dromedarius</em>) in Algeria. Data were collected from 16 articles describing 31 studies qualified for data extraction and published between 1990 and 2022. The total sample size was 12227 camels of which 1988 (16.14%) were tested positive for abortive diseases. The bacterial abortive diseases were caused by brucellosis, Q fever and chlamydiosis of which the prevalences were respectively 3.35%, 73.35%, and 2.5%. Parasitic abortive diseases were detected in 14.01% and in 15% of examined camels infected with trypanosomiasis and toxoplasmosis, respectively. Bluetongue, Akabane virus, bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and bovine viral diarrhea were reported as the viral abortive diseases which the prevalences were, in order, 14.4%, 1.8%, 6.98%, and 25.2%. This study provides a systematic overview of the epidemiology of abortive diseases in camels in Algeria and will be a useful tool for other researchers. More widespread and robust prevalence studies are needed to adequately inform risk assessment and management of animal and public health threats.</p> Nadjet Amina Khelifi Touhami, Meriem Mekroud, Omar Salhi, Nassim Ouchene Copyright (c) https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/1969