Comparison between Serum and Saliva Biochemical Constituents in Dairy Cows during Lactation and Dry Period

  • Mahmoud R. Abd Ellah
  • Keiji Okada
  • Shinsuke Shimamura
  • Saori Kobayashi
  • Reeko Sato
  • Jun Yasuda

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to compare serum and salivary biochemical constituents during lactation and dry period in dairy cows. Also, the present study evaluated for the first time the salivary biochemical constituents in dairy cows. The study was carried out using 45 healthy multiparous Holstein cows maintained in dairy farms located in Morioka city (Iwate prefecture, Japan). Cows were classified into groups based on the month of lactation. Serum, saliva and milk samples were collected and analyzed. Data were statistically analyzed and the variation in serum and salivary biochemical constituents during lactation and dry period were discussed. From the present study, it could be concluded that the 1st month of lactation has the highest levels for serum free fatty acids (FFA), β- Hydroxy butyric acid (BHBA) and aceto Acetic acid (ACAC). The dry period has the highest serum glucose level and the lowest serum FFA, BHBA and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Both serum and salivary FFA showed the highest value during the 1st month of lactation. Saliva contains a high level of gamma glutamyl transferase. The level of ammonia in saliva is higher than its serum level during all months of lactation and dry period. Most of the biochemical constituents in saliva change in different way from serum during lactation and dry period. Milk protein/fat ratio of 0.7 may be not indicative for subclinical ketosis.

Published
2015-07-01
How to Cite
ABD ELLAH, Mahmoud R. et al. Comparison between Serum and Saliva Biochemical Constituents in Dairy Cows during Lactation and Dry Period. Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 3, p. 143-150, july 2015. ISSN 2090-6277. Available at: <https://advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/57>. Date accessed: 24 apr. 2019.
Section
Original Research